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Work Behaviour

What Is Work Behaviour?

One of the important objectives of the field of organizational behavior is to understand why people behave the way they do. Which behaviors are we referring to here? We will focus on 4 key work behaviors: job performance, organizational citizenship behaviors, absenteeism, and turnover. These are not the only behaviors OB is concerned about, but understanding what is meant by these terms and understanding the major influences over each type of behavior will give you more clarity about analyzing the behaviors of others in the workplace.

Work behavior is the behavior one uses in employment and is normally more formal than other types of human behavior. This varies from profession to profession, as some are far more casual than others. For example, a computer programmer would usually have far more leeway in their work than a lawyer.

People are usually more careful than outside work in how they behave around their colleagues, as many actions intended to be in jest can be perceived as inappropriate or even harassment in the work environment. In some cases, men may take considerably more care so as not to be perceived as being sexually harassing than they would ordinarily.

Work behavior is one of the significant aspects of Human Behavior. It is an individual's communication towards the rest of the members of the workplace. It involves both verbal as well as non-verbal mode of communication. For example, trust is a non-verbal behavior which is often reflected by verbal communication at a workforce. It represents your attitude towards your team and colleagues. A positive and good work behavior of an individual leads to higher performance, productivity and great outputs by the team or an individual. From the organizational perspective it is the most important area where Human Resource managers should focus.

How Does Behavior Affect Work Performance?

Your disposition, mood and feelings impact everything from your ability to make effective decisions to the level of your creativity and ability to work well with others. Inconsiderate behaviors such as rudeness and gossiping also interrupt the smooth flow of the workplace. Your behavior may even affect whether you keep your job. Transferring feelings to workplace behaviors affects your work performance

Happiness

Businesses are beginning to direct attention to happiness as a workplace issue and are developing management strategies to create a happier work environment, notes Wharton University professor Sigal Barsade. When you arrive at work with a positive attitude, you generally are more creative and tolerant of others; you aren't so defensive and create conflicts among your coworkers or subordinates. When employees are happy, everything from sales to production flow more smoothly and effectively. An enjoyable workplace lowers stress, increases morale and creates camaraderie.

Rudeness

You can observe many forms of rudeness at work. Interruptions are rarely life or death, yet many of your fellow employees may feel that no matter what you are doing, what they have to say is more important. Simple words like “please” and “thank you” often are left unsaid in the workplace. Employees may have the attitude that someone else is going to clean up after them in the break room kitchen. Rudeness at work can lower productivity and lead to mistakes and conflicts, explains Jennifer A. Bunk, a West Chester University professor and member of the Society of Industrial & Organizational Psychology. Rudeness not only makes for an unpleasant work environment, but it also harms productivity and decreases job satisfaction

Gossip

One of the most difficult habits to break is gossiping about your fellow employees. Besides the obvious drain on productivity, gossip increases conflict, undermines your team’s performance, decreases morale and promotes miscommunications. When conflicts ensue, employees take sides or refuse to work with each other. Gossip breaks down trust, which eventually erodes your workplace energy and hinders your success.

Bullying

The Washington State Department of Labor and Industries says bullying is an act of intimidation designed to humiliate or undermine another. Bullying not only affects work performance, it also can put employees at serious risk for their safety. Bullies are driven by a need to control and to abuse or misuse power. Victims of bullying may experience physical and mental health problems from reduced self-esteem, sleep deprivation and digestive disturbances. The behavior can lead to accumulated absences and even post-traumatic stress disorder.

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